Service Areas

Gandert Door is based out of Mansfield, Ohio, which makes for easy access to areas in every direction. Our main service area includes Richland and surrounding counties. These counties are Ashland, Crawford, Huron, Knox, and Morrow.

Ohio State Reformatory

Richland County

Towns: Mansfield, Bellville, Butler, Lexington, Lucas, Shelby

2010 Census Population: 124,475

Mansfield, Ohio is the home of many things, including Gandert Door. Richland County is also home to the Ohio State Reformatory in Mansfield, the birth of the Ohio seamless tube industry in Shelby, and Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington. Because of the attractions and population, Richland County is the commercial hub of North Central Ohio.

Ashland University

Ashland County

Towns: Ashland, Hayesville, Jeromesville, Loudonville, Nova, Perrysville, Polk, Savannah

2010 Census Population: 53,139

Ashland University, In Ashland, Ohio, is known to have one of the best nursing schools in the state, as well as an outstanding graduate program. Ashland County is also where you can find a large Amish community and one of the largest chicken hatcheries in the State of Ohio.

Mansfield, Ohio is the home of many things, including Gandert Door. Richland County is also home to the Ohio State Reformatory in Mansfield, the birth of the Ohio seamless tube industry in Shelby, and Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington. Because of the attractions and population, Richland County is the commercial hub of North Central Ohio.

The Bucyrus Bratwurst Festival

Crawford County

Towns: Bucyrus, Chatfield, Crestline, Galion, New Washington, Oceola

2010 Census Population: 43,784

Crawford County is largely rural, with a lot of open space available for crops. Bucyrus is known as the Bratwurst Capital of America and has a Bratwurst Festival every year. Galion’s gifted program starts early and is highly regarded within the state.

Downtown Norwalk

Huron County

Towns: Fitchville, Greenwich, Plymouth, Willard

2010 Census Population: 59,626

The soil of Huron County Is rich with nutrients, which makes it prime real estate for farming. There are a multitude of vegetable and sod forms in and around Willard. Additionally, Bellvue is where you can find the massive Jungle-Junction Indoor Playground. If you have a need for speed, You can go to Summit Motorsports Park near Norwalk, which hosts Night Under Fire every year.

Kokosing river

Knox County

Towns: Centerburg, Danville, Fredericktown

2010 Census Population: 60,921

Knox County’s slow rolling hills make it a perfect place for a Golf Course. Apple Valley Golf Course near Mount Vernon has an exceptional rating of 4.6 out of 5 on Golf Advisor. In Knox County, you’ll also find Kokosing Gap Trail, which is a 14-mile trail that used to be part of the Pennsylvania Railroad right-of-way.

Harding Tomb

Marion County

Towns: Marion, Caledonia, Green Camp, LaRue, Waldo

2010 Census Population: 66,501

Warren G Harding, the 29th President of the United States was born in Blooming Grove, Ohio in Morrow County, but he spent much of his life in Marion County. You can visit his childhood home in Caledonia as well as the Harding Tomb in Marion. While in Marion County, you can also enjoy the Wyandot Popcorn Museum. Marion county holds their Popcorn Festival in early September every year. And while you are hear, stop to see the Granite Revolving Ball in Marion Cemetery.

Levering Hall

Morrow County

Towns: Mount Gilead, Cardington, Chesterville, Edison, Marengo

2010 Census Population: 34,827

The open countryside makes Morrow County a beautiful place for parks and fishing. Included in their parks are Mount Gilead State Park, Clear Fork Reservoir, and Heimlich Park. Morrow County is also home to Levering Hall, Old Union School, and 13 other locations on the National Register of Historic Places.

Knox County’s slow rolling hills make it a perfect place for a Golf Course. Apple Valley Golf Course near Mount Vernon has an exceptional rating of 4.6 out of 5 on Golf Advisor. In Knox County, you’ll also find Kokosing Gap Trail, which is a 14-mile trail that used to be part of the Pennsylvania Railroad right-of-way.